Sunday, 27 January 2013

Bulgaria Funds Varna Roman Baths Restoration with BGN 3 M



The Roman Baths are one of the most valuable monuments of culture in Bulgaria's Black Sea city of Varna.
Photo by historvius.com
Bulgarian Deputy Prime Minister and Finance MinisterSimeon Djankov, has pledged the significant amount of BGN 3 M for restoration and conservation of the historical Roman Baths in the Black Sea city of Varna.
The sum came as a pleasant surprise to archaeologists who have asked for BGN 200 000.
Djankov made the pledge during a discussion organized by the Bulgarian Standard daily in Varna in the frame of the newspaper's campaign "The Miracles of Bulgaria."
The Minister stated the idea to provide significant funds under the Via Ponticaprogram was not to give more money for archaeological research, but to make existing archaeological sites more attractive in order to boost tourism. He called on archaeologists to be creative in inventing names and stories around their discoveries.
The program is named after the Via Pontica bird migration flyway.

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Thursday, 24 January 2013

ALBANIAN FRESCOES SUSTAIN IRREVERSIBLE DAMAGE


Before and after photographs of damaged fresco. Image: Auron Tare

Important medieval frescoes of St. Premte Chapel in the remote village of Valsh in central Albania, have suffered irreparable damage at the hands of thieves who tried to prize them from the walls.


The frescoes mainly depict religious scenes, some of which were created by Onufri, a 16th century icon painter who spent a period of his life in Valsh. Widely considered to be Albania’s greatest icon painter, Onufri is renowned for his colours and style and introduced greater realism and individuality into facial expressions, breaking with the strict conventions of Byzantine art. His works were signed with the title “Protopapas” (Greek: Πρωτόπαππας), demonstrating a senior position in the church hierarchy.

Irreversible damage

Initial damage to the frescoes was sustained on 30 December 2012 when the Chapel was closed and unguarded. Local people made the discovery soon after and notified the authorities – but no action was taken – allowing the thieves to strike again on 4 January 2013.


Monday, 21 January 2013

Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Greek Trade Center in Bulgaria


Archaeologist and professor Mieczysław Domaradzki likely made one of the great discoveries of his life when, in 1990, he and his colleagues uncovered, at a site along the banks of the Maritsa River in Bulgaria, an ancient stone Greek inscription.  The inscription, today known as the Vetren Inscription (named after the nearby town of Vetren), revealed the site as the location of the ancient Greek trading center, or emporion, of Pistiros.

But the inscription revealed more than this. It afforded a rare glimpse into the special relationship that the Pistiros Greeks had with their Thracian hosts, as Pistiros sat deep within the territory of the 5th - 3rd century B.C. Thracian Odryssian kings:
If a merchant brings suit against another merchant (in Pistiros) they shall be judged among their kinsmen and with regard to whatever is owed to the merchants by Thracians, there shall be no cancellation of these debts. All land and pasture owned by the merchants shall not be taken away from them. He shall not send holders of estates(?) to the merchants.
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BALKAN HERITAGE FIELD SCHOOL


the BALKAN HERITAGE FIELD SCHOOL is accepting EARLY BIRD APPLICATIONS* through January 31st 2013 for 9 field school projects in the following areas: Archeology, Art History, Restoration and Conservation of Artifacts and Monuments (Please refer to the list below and the promo flier attached). Thank to the partnership with New Bulgarian University, Sofia, Bulgaria 6 academic credits (for two-week projects) and 9 academic credits (for four-week projects) will be granted upon request to students who attend to these projects.

Go to the Website...

Tuesday, 15 January 2013

Archaeological finds reveal ancient Balkan civilizations

Numerous gold items have been recovered at archeological sites in Bulgaria. [AFP]

Bulgarian archaeologists announced two major finds at the close of the 2012 excavation season, and hope to obtain state and other financial support to shed more light on the life and culture of the early Balkan civilisations. 

Vasil Nikolov, former head of the country's National Archaeology Institute, unearthed Europe's oldest urban settlement near Provadia, 50 kilometres west of Varna on the Black Sea, which is dated between 4700 and 4200 BC. 

The site is more than 100 metres in diameter, is encompassed by a 3-meter high stone wall and has two-story structures housing nearly 350 residents. 

The settlement is one part of a much larger complex from the same period, which includes a salt production unit, a sanctuary and a necropolis.

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2,000-year-old treasure found in Black Sea fortress

The citadel was torched by the Roman army in A.D. 45, with many of its inhabitants likely killed. Some time afterward Artezian was rebuilt with stronger fortifications although it, along with the rest of the Bosporan Kingdom, was under the sway of Rome
[Credit: Russian-Ukrainian Archaeological Artezian Expedition]

Residents of a town under siege by the Roman army about 2,000 years ago buried two hoards of treasure in the town's citadel — treasure recently excavated by archaeologists.

More than 200 coins, mainly bronze, were found along with "various items of gold, silver and bronze jewelry and glass vessels" inside an ancient fortress within the Artezian settlement in the Crimea (in Ukraine), the researchers wrote in the most recent edition of the journal Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia.
"The fortress had been besieged. Wealthy people from the settlement and the neighborhood had tried to hide there from the Romans. They had buried their hoards inside the citadel," Nikolaï Vinokurov, a professor at Moscow State Pedagogical University, explained.

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Sunday, 13 January 2013

2,000-Year-Old Treasure Discovered In Black Sea Fortress


Residents of a town under siege by the Roman army about 2,000 years ago buried two hoards of treasure in the town's citadel — treasure recently excavated by archaeologists.

More than 200 coins, mainly bronze, were found along with "various items of gold, silver and bronze jewelry and glass vessels" inside an ancient fortress within the Artezian settlement in the Crimea (in Ukraine), the researchers wrote in the most recent edition of the journal Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia.

"The fortress had been besieged. Wealthy people from the settlement and the neighborhood had tried to hide there from the Romans.  They had buried their hoards inside the citadel," Nikolaï Vinokurov, a professor at Moscow State Pedagogical University, explained. [See Photos of the Buried Treasure]

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